Presenting Abenaki History in the Classroom

Music, history and archaeology, weaving, social justice issues, heirloom plants and fire-pit cooking: through a combination of lectures and experiential learning, Abenaki scholars, historians, and culture bearers present their vibrant regional culture that reaches back nearly 13,000 years and continues into the 21st century. This 2 ½-day professional development seminar offers up-to-date information on Abenaki culture to prepare educators of all levels to present Abenaki culture in their classrooms and better support Abenaki and other Native American students. Market research by the Vermont Abenaki Artists Association (VAAA) indicates that many teachers unknowingly use outdated resources, and people are further confused by images of Native Americans in the media. Members of the VAAA serve as faculty for this interdisciplinary seminar at Lake Champlain Maritime Museum. This rich learning experience is designed to provide educators (from teachers at schools and historic sites to homeschool teachers) with new resources and techniques to help students learn about Abenaki culture.

Audience: All Educators

When: Wednesday, August 3 – 4, 2017 from 9:30am-4pm

Where: Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, 4472 Basin Harbor Road, Vergennes, VT

Cost: $375 for certificate program or $550 if taken for credit from Castleton College. Registration fee includes lunch, program materials, and certification

Register at: Lake Champlain Maritime Museum

Upcoming Events

April 19 th, 2018, 7:00 pm – Wearing Our Heritage – Contemporary Abenaki artists and tribal members talk about the meaning of garments, accessories and regalia in their own lives and in the expression of community and tribal identity. This program was created by the Vermont Abenaki Artists Association in partnership with Lake Champlain Maritime Museum and Flynn Center for the Arts, supported in part by a grant from the Vermont Humanities Council. Charlotte Library, Shelburne, VT. Admission is free.

May 7, 2018 – Abenaki Woman’s Panel Discussion- Native American women are perhaps the most marginalized group of people in Vermont. Discussion by a panel of Native women will address their struggles coming to terms with the dichotomy between the respected position of Abenaki women in our past and how society has lost respect for women; their roles as culture bearers, leaders and mothers; and how cultural traditions suggest possibilities for change in the future.  This program was created by the Vermont Abenaki Artists Association in partnership with Lake Champlain Maritime Museum and Flynn Center for the Arts, supported in part by a grant from the Vermont Humanities Council. Fletcher Free, Burlington, VT. Admission is free.

June 23 & 24 – Abenaki Heritage Weekend  – This special weekend organized by Vermont Abenaki Artists Association and presented at Lake Champlain Maritime Museum gives visitors an Abenaki perspective on life in the Champlain Valley. Dancing, drumming, storytelling, craft and cooking demonstrations are presented by members of Vermont’s Abenaki Tribes. The Native Arts Marketplace and exhibit opening celebration provide opportunities to meet some of the artists featured in the special exhibition Abenaki Ornamaentation: From Trade Beads to Sead Beads. Lake Champlain Maritime Museum 4472 Basin Harbor Rd. Vergennes, VT 05491 · (802) 475-2022. More information

August 3 & 4 – Teaching Abenaki History and Culture.  Two day and a half professional development seminar for teachers, museum educators, and home schoolers. Certificate provided upon sucessful completion of 20-hour program. More information